Backup and Recovery

Backup and Recovery

No information system can be safe from damage or failure. Any data that has been stored can be deleted or altered, whether it's deliberately or accidentally.
For example, all of your HSC study notes could be lost if the folder they were stored in was deleted by one of your family members because they needed some more room on the hard drive.
Data Backup is like an insurance policy against this kind of accident or system failure. Data backup creates a copy (referred to as the 'backup') of all the data files stored on the main storage device and places an extra copy onto a different storage device.
For example, an information system manager employed by the business will make regular backups of data, to ensure that if any data is lost, it can be retrieved again through data recovery.
There are many software applications that can organise and undertake data backup processes automatically or regularly.
Data Recovery involves retrieving the backup from the second device and storing the data back onto the original device. In the worst case scenario where the entire hard drive has been erased, the backup software will automatically selct the latest version of the files and restore them on the new hard drive.
A further safety measure is Off-Site storage. This is used to protect the backup data from theft and destruction. Off-site storage takes the data or storage media (disk or hard drive) to a different location, away from the computer. This protects the data against theft and destruction. It may be one of the company's employees jobs to take daily backups to the off site storage every day, or a data security company can to it for you. Backups can be sent to a remote facility via. the internet, but a high speed and reliable connection is essential.
An important part of performing any data backup is to check that the software has stored tha backup files correctly.